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tv   Studio B With Shepard Smith  FOX News  February 22, 2013 3:00pm-4:00pm EST

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will answer some of your questions, and help you find the aarp medicare supplement plan that's right for you. >> thanking for watching, studio b starts right now. >> shepard: the news begins anew on "studio b." the blade runner is free on bail. accused of murder. the judge today let the track star go free until he goes on trial for killing his model girlfriend. a live report just ahead. >> a deadly winter storm covering the country's mid-section is moving east. and a cop, say a man who died in the rolling shootout on the las vegas victim was aspiring rapper with a criminal record. that's all ahead.
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>> from fox, at 3:00 in new york city, the blade runner, oscar pistorius, is free to go. the judge granted bail for the history-making track star accused of murdering his model girlfriend, and the judge's ruling capped off a long speech inside the courtroom. reporters say he went on for nearly two hours, recapping the arguments from both sides and the drama that unfolded during the past week. the south african runner is alleged to have killed his girlfriend. he fired not one but four shots through the bathroom door. oscar pistorius said he thought he was firing at an intruder. the track star openly weeping in court again today. the judge also slammed the former lee detective saying he, quote, bungled while gathering evidence. that investigator is now off the case after cops revealed he
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faced seven counts of attempted murder from a different shooting. here's the judge. >> i come to the conclusion that ... the accused will be released on bail. >> you heard supporters of the track star shout, yes, and a similar reaction from fans outside the courtroom. look. >> now, keep in mind, as star pistorius is not out of the woods. far from. a full murder trial could get underway this year. and the meantime the judge ordered him to give up his passports and guns and can't leave the district, pretoria, without an okay from this parole officer. greg, what was it like inside there and why did the judge grant bail?
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reporter: it was an amazing scene. i was five feet from oscar pistorius, and i saw him break down several times, including when the judge granted bail. he said did it because pistorius was not a flight risk and not a danger to others. now, late today it's reported the family posted a portion of the $113,000 bail and pistorius left the obvious we believe he wasn't to his uncle's house. this is the uncle. >> we are relieved the fact that oscar got bail today. but at the same time, we are in mourning for the death of reeva. reporter: the spokesman for the family of the victim also spoke out today. he said all they want is justice and truth.
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>> shepard: may have gotten bail but the story did not impress the judge. tell us about that. reporter: absolutely. the judge gave some real serious knocks to the defense team, saying aspects of their story of the dadely night were, i quote, improbable, and also, his words, he had difficulties with a lot of it. for that reason he said he is sticking with a premeditated murder charge against pistorius, carrying a maximum life sentence. the trial is set to start on june 4th but we're told that could slip a bit as both sides jockey for position. we have only just begun. back to you. >> shepard: thanks. keep in mind, both sides have painted completely different pictures of what happened on the night -- the day oscar pistorius shot his girlfriend. you can bet that will have a big impact on the case. jonathan hunt is in studio this afternoon. i don't now holiday big a surprised this was to people,
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but the bail, little over $100,000? >> a very low bail on this. which is interesting. what is interesting here, shep, is the way the prosecution and pistorius' attorneys painted completely different pictures. first of all, the runup to the shooting. pistorius claims he and reeva steenkamp were asleep in his home, which you see right there the prosecution says, no so. in fact they were awake and arguing for perhaps a couple of hours before hand and people living nearby, a few hundred feet away, heard that. then there's the shooting itself. pistorius said -- look at this mockup. he says he thought the was an intruder who may have entered through the balcony door, and he hauled himself to the bathroom routh putting on his legs, he believed the intruder was in the
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toilet cubicle and he fired. the prosecution showed a floor plan of the bedroom during their presentation they said he knew, pistorius, knew full well steenkamp was in the bathroom. he took the time to put on his prosthetic legs, then walk to the bathroom and fired, intending to kill her. now, was she in bed or not when pistorius got out of bed? irthey're asleep together how could he not notice she was in the bed. he says it was dark in the bathroom, he just assumed she was there and asleep. the prosecution says his gun was under her side of t bed so when he reached around to get it, he must have known she wasn't there then there's the aftermath. pistorius says he called the manager of the housing complex, asked him to call for an ambulance, he says he called a private paramedic service on a phone that the cops didn't find. the prosecution says there were no calls to the police or the ambulance service on any of the four cell phones they found in
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the bathroom and the bedroom. this will all be sorted out in the full trial and it will be heard by a single judge. no jury system there. so more difficult for him to go across that reasonable doubt threshold with a judge rather than a jury. >> shepard: might be difficult, period. you're saying the gun was on her side of the bed where he claimed she was asleep but he didn't notice. reporter: whether he crawled around without his prosthetics or walked down, there's no way he could not have nope. >> shepard: with us now, an author and contributing wright for the "new york times" magazine. michael, interviewed pistorius and the sprinter took him to a gun range. thanks for coming. you've told our bookers that oscar pistorius, when he couldn't sleep well, would go to the gun range. >> oscar, unlike most high
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performance athletes who train and seat and sleep, is a very restless man. often didn't sleep well, and going to the range is one of the things he did when he couldn't sleep. it's not something i think most of us do to settle us done but it's what oscar did. >> shepard: seems like a weird time to go. sometimes it's noisy there. what other impressions did cow come away with after spending time with him? >> i liked oscar. i like oscar very much. he is a magnetic, charismatic, highly intelligent man. i think that my reaction to oscar is a pretty common one. oscar brought people to him. he is very relational, in my experience, he treated people, men and women, with respect. so, this is a shock, an absolute shock to me, it saddens me. it's not something i would have ever expected out of him. >> shepard: i heart heard people talk about him as having a
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violent streak. >> i didn't see it. he had a risk-taking streak. oscar drives his car, which is a racecar -- it's not something you can even get at normal dealership -- at literally 150-miles-an-hour. he crashed his speed boat. he races dirt bikes. this is a guy with a lot of physical daring. so i worried about him hurts himself. didn't see him hurting someone else. >> shepard: reading some quotes here. we should go to the range. the fetched cars and ammunition and he instructed on proper technique. he was a good coach, you wrote. >> he was good coach. he wasn't some crazed person at a range. i mean, he showed me the gun. he showed me how to load it. he cautioned me not to point it in any one's direction, and it was a sport to him, and it was a
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tool to him. it wasn't something thatle seemed to animate him in any kind of alarming way. >> shepard: thank you for being here, michael sokolove from "the new york times." appreciate it. the feds are joining a lawsuit against the liar and cheater, lance armstrong. a suit that could cost the disgraced cyclists tens of millions of dollars. according to armstrong0s attorney the justice department is accusing armstrong of defrauding his long-time sponsor, the is postal service. and as you mightman imagine, the postal service needs money and wants its own money back, plus damages. guess how much the postal service wants from lance armstrong? $1 million. -- $100 million. he admitted last month that he doped in each of his tour de france win, after years of ruthless attacks on anybody who
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would accuse him. armstrongs lawyer is disputing where the postalervice suffered any damages. he claims the sponsorship benefited the government. >> a huge mess across the midwest, emergency crews reporting lots of problems. the latest on this massive storm and what to expect this weekend. plus, handicapping the oscars. predictions on the biggestwaters come -- biggest awards coming up. technology not moving forwad is moving backward. [ engine turns over, tires squeal ] and you'll find advanced safety technology like an available heads-up display on the 2013 lexus gs. there's no going back.
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a weather alert. the massive winter sonoma is still causing big travel delays. the airline tracking web site flight aware, the storm sparked nearly 300 cancelled flights in and out of chicago. other flight, 90-minute delay. truckers in the region took the night off as snow, rain, sleet, turned the roadways into an icy mess. officials report it dozens of car crashes, two deadly.
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janice dean is live in the weather center, first, let's get to claudia, live in kansas city. looks like the day after. reporter: the sun is out this afternoon. the storm has moved on but it's still a snow day for the kids and a bit of rough going on the roads. not so much on the main highways or the city streets like this one here downtown but more in the residential nabbeds -- neighborhoods where the snow plows have not been able to get in there the roads were an icy mess yesterday. but no major accident or crashes, probably because a lot of people stayed home and poor visibility made it hard for anyone to drive very fast. those out and about do need to be careful, especially if the streets are lined with large snow drifts. we saw some impressive totals yesterday. 10-inches of snow in kansas city. 14-inches in wichita, a record
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9.2 inches of snow at the kansas city airport which had to close and cancelled more than 400 flights. the airport is open again now and hundreds of stranded travelers are getting on the way. >> did a good job on the streets. it's my understanding you got all kind of different precipitation there. reporter: it was a very dynamic storm. folks here saw snow, of course, and freezing rain, as well as what the national weather service is calling thunder sleet, and even lightning, some dramatic images last night at lightning lit up the skyline, and temperatures in the 20s, at least for the next few days. all of this heavy snow will be here for a while, and farmers struggling with the long and severe drought hope that's the case. the slower it takes for it to melt, the more the snow will help out. now it oops the storm door is open. forecasters talking about another chance of snow by next week. >> shepard: in kansas kirk claudia sliding out. janice dean slide in from the
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extreme weather center. what now? >> look at the storm totals. we could see another storm next week. six to 12 inches maybe for kansas city, and it's 86 degrees in orlando today. let's all go there. 20 inches in kansas, phillipsburg, 18. this is record snow. smith center, 15.6. the largest city snowfall total they've if had in that area of kansas. let's look at it right now. the low pressure center associate with the storm system across the great lakes, still winter weather advisories and we have winter weather advisories across the mid-atlantic and the northeast for the next whethermaker. the stalled-out frontal boundary brings or three inches of rain to the area and potential for severe weather as well. the next system will develop across the coast. you can see it here over the
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southeast. low pressure center off the coast, inching up towards the northeast, and could bring us north and west of the boston yeah, six to 12-inches of snow. the third weekend for snowfall across the boston area. so as you can see, watching it very closely saturday and sunday, new york, down towards philadelphia and d.c., mainly a rain event, but just to show you, the next 72 hours, watch the storm develop across the eastern seaboard, and in the next few days across -- the northwest. kansas city. >> it's 86 in orlando. >> shepard: don't rub it: it's been nearly three years since the oil company, bp, changed its reputation forever and it presided over what is probably the biggest environmental disaster in american history.
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well, today, bp's lawyers are still trying to save the company from paying fines for the explosion and oil spill in the golf gulf of mexico. we'll seal how the company is getting ready for a court fight and why some groups say an extra 25 billion is in order.
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>> 22 minutes past the hour. looks like bp will not shell out anymore more for the oil disaster without putting up a fight. they want its life back. it's set to go to court on monday to defend itself in a civil trial. the explosion killed 11 workers. and the resulting leak gushed for three months, spilled five million barrels at least of toxic crude into the gulf of mexico. five million barrels.
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poisoned fish. killed wildlife, left a seafood industry out of work and turned opposite very busy tourist spots into temporary ghost towns. government investigators blamed bp and its partners, accused them of dangerous cost-cutting moves. it skimped and it employed. bp paid 4-1/2 billion to the federal government but in the civil case bp's lawyers refused to settle, calling demands for more fines excessive. they vowed to fight the government's claims the company was grossly neglect. excessive, 11 million people. >> -- 11 dead people. >> bp should be begging to settle this case. it was mess from the get-go and they should accept responsibility. how many people are out of work. those poor people who died.
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states who have now revenue from tacks, all that ruined property. bp should sit down with the justice department and say, how much should we settle this for and let's move on and try to correct our business practices to make them proper in the future. that is not what we're seeing. >> shepard: in many cases it's the small business person, and the employee of a small business, who got left out of this. the federal government got a lot of money but those individuals who lost in some cases everything, have gotten in some cases, nothing. >> and that's what we're looking at. we're looking at on monday, the justice department and a lot of these smaller people are bundled into one suit. going to trial in new orleans, and the federal court in new orleans. so we have four states and all the individuals going to trial together with the jet department saying, hey, bp, you need to pay up on the civil damages because you weren't as negligent. you were grossly neglect gent. your conduct was reckless,on
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what in individual would do. it was inappropriate, and beyond which it was knowingly done and willfully done to actually create the damage that was created, and that's a big claim, and bp said, oh, no, we shouldn't have to pay. look at all the money these people have lost? who is go to pay them. >> shepard: they pleaded get to 14 criminal charges including manslaughter. the civil trial could get them up to 17.6 billion in fines but environmental groups are saying it's going to take an extra 25 billion to correct the problems which bp, of its own admission, cautioned. >> right. there's a 17.1 billion cap just on the amount they would have to pay if they're found grossly negligent, for the amount of oil spilled. but there are other claims in, loss of tax revenues so the verdict could go much higher, because all the claims. the problem is, want to encourage a settlement because
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you want the money in hand and you don't want to waist not year or two for these people to get money and you dope want them to take cents on the dollar. you want to take a dollar, the amount of money to compensate these people. i they have to put themselves back in business. these states have to clean up and correct the problem that bp caused. >> shepard: the cleaning up, don't think it stops. they're still finding weird fish and dead zones that weren't there before, but are there now. it's my understanding from reading and -- my understanding bp is about to blame its partners. >> we're going to blame halliburton and other guys that were working, companies that are sayi, straight up, we followed bp's orders. so we're willing to accept that we did certain things but we have evidence to prove we did these things because bp told us to. so, we're in the situation now where bp is pointing fingers at people, but at the reality is,
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why don't we sit down and try to get this settled, bp and just accept that it was a very terrible situation that you created. >> shepard: thank you. i've gotten so much corporations from so many of you. so we're covering it. casey stiegel will be there for the whole trial. it's a civil trial. this in most cases is about the little guy against the big oil company, and we'll be there. >> millions of folks dealing with more than a foot of snow in places that usually don't see a flake. where the monster storm is taking aim next. coming up as we approach the about of the hour.
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>> this is "studio b." at it the bottom of the hour. time for the top of the news. the freezing rain and snow sparked more than 200 car crashes this morning in the state of minnesota alone. the worst of this monster snowstorm is now over for much of the central u.s. as it heads to the great lakes and look out boston. folks in missouri, kansas, nebraska, are still dealing with up to 17 inches of snow so far. mike tobin is live in omaha, how much did you get? >> about eight inches and life is creeping back to normal. you can see the sun is coming out. it's warming up the roads, melting the snow on the roads, and largely people still have
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the day off. kids aren't in school, people aren't at work, and the traffic is right and the snow plows have an easy time of tidying 'the work. the road crews are giving credit to the people who said home, got out of the way, let them too their job. they maxed out their shifts, ran their routes, and the end, the snow here was not as bad as what they had anticipated. the scene was repeated as the storm moved east. you had trucks in the truck stops riding out the storm. now there's another storm in the forecast, upwards of six inches, shep. >> shepard: rough drought. they can use this, frankly. >> they could, and last summer the corn crop did so bad nice didn't hey the heart, and the low water level in the mississippi, the snow will melt, run into the missouri river, connect with the mississippi right where the barges need it
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the most. >> shepard: mike, thank you. >> in cleveland, a unite airlines jet skidded off a returnway at hopkins international airport. an airport spokesman says the 737 touched down, then slid off the runway into a grassy area. officials used buses to transfer the passenger are and crew members to the terminal. >> drops are no longer just for hunting down americas enemies. these tase they're also watching americans. police have unmanned drones in the sky, number that is likely to rise and fast. federal aviation officials say the key about some 30,000 drones over the united states within just seven years. officials say they will be used for search and rescue missions to staking out suspects, but lawmakers are pushing to put limits on their use before everything we do winds up on camera. catherine heritage, live in
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washington. what's the case for more of these things? reporter: the prodrone lobby says the faa will be approving thousands of new licenses and that will be for the public sector, and then ultimately the private sector. right now there are 3 27 drone licenses in the u.s., and the faa projects 10,000 active uav licenses by 2017, less than five years from now. and of the 18,000 police departments in the u.s., just a small minority, about 300, have the money for aerial assets such as helicopters or light aircraft. and most drones available under these faa licenses will look like this one, costing between 10 and $50,000, with flight times of an hour oralisms drone supporters say they're best used for surveillance for crowd control, missing children, or even forress fires. >> it's just an extra tool in the tool kit for the first responders to use and more affordable than the manned assets out there.
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reporter: the bottom line there is a lot of misconceptions. the small drone conclude note weaponnized or armed. >> shepard: unless you consider the government spying on you a weapon. once they get 10 or 20 million, they'll be able to watch every one of us do everything. >> that's the point made by the aclu and others. we're looking at a potential tsunami of drones and the law is not keeping pace with the number of dreams and the type of technology that can be used to spy on individual americans and then take that information and store the dat attempt here's the aclu. >> number one, drones should never be used to look into private areas leak your bedroom window or b. without a water. number two,own you're in public, you're being watched by the people around you but you don't expect you're being tracked all day by someone seen eye in the sky. that shouldn't be able to happen without a warrant. >> the aclu says there's a
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supreme court ruling, and it's not necessarily encouraging when it comes to protecting privacy. in a california case the court playground was in expectation of approve sendsy when the cop's flew a plain over a guy's backyard who was growing cop pot, and the cop did not need a warrant. >> shepard: thank you. well, those harsh spending cuts set to kick in a week from today? they will unless the president and lawmakers can reach a deal and it would be ease you for them to dot that they'll have to do is say, never mind. but, no, department of transportation secretary ray la hood earned the cuts could trigger flight cancellations, even named some airports that may have to shut down control towers. including vacation destinations like boca raton, hilton hed, south carolina, and others. many republicans say with the clock ticking the president
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needs to spend more time at the bargaining table. >> wendell is live at the white house. >> the president says there's still time to do the right thing and agree a balanced approach by cutting the deficit, which means tax revenue. bought day after speaking with the top republicans in the house and senate for the first time this year, they say he needs to convince democrats to go along with medicare and medicaid cuts to get control of the deficit. they accuse mr. obama of being more focused on warning about the impact of the sequester than negotiating to avoid it. today outgoing transportation secretary ray la hood warned airport security lines will stretch out, flies will be cancelled, some airport towers will be closed if the faa has to keep up the current level of safety. la hood, who is a republican, called out his own party members to take a page from lincoln. >> this requires republicans
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stepping forward with ideas how to keep essential services of government run. this is not rocket science. this is people coming together, the way that other congresses have done, to solve big issues. reporter: house republicans say they appealed the sequester replacement in may. the white house hopes the senate will pass the bill next week, but it's up likely the house will go long given the president's demand that tax rev few be part of the been fixing the deficit. many say, quote, obama has time for everyone and everything except those that count in order to avert the sequester. the president is going to new port new york virginia, next week to spotlight ship builders who will lose work if the sequester happens. >> shepard: not sure how you worked there for 25 years. i could not do it. best of luck. >> i got kids, shepherd.
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>> wendell could fix it. just put wendell in charge. he'd go, never mind, because that's all they have to too. just say no, never mind, on sequestration or want they want to call it. never mind. but they're not. the white house is trying to get iran to take its nuclear program seriously, and especially negotiations. we'll get into the strategy with chris wallace next. the fatal shooting and crash on the las vegas strip you heard about this? we learn a lot more about the victim as police try to find the killers who are still on the run. as fox reports live. what's next?
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he's going to apply testosterone to his underarm. axiron, the only underarm treatment for low t, can restore testosterone levels back to normal in most men. axiron is not for use in women or anyone younger than 18. axiron can transfer to others through direct contact. women, especially those who are or who may become pregnant, and children should avoid contact where axiron is applied
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as unexpected signs of puberty in children or changes in body hair or increased acne in women may occur. report these signs and symptoms to your doctor if they occur. tell your doctor about all medical conditions and medications. do not use if you have prostate or breast cancer. serious side effects could include increased risk of prostate cancer; worsening prostate symptoms; decreased sperm count; ankle, feet, or body swelling; enlarged or painful breasts; problems breathing while sleeping; and blood clots in the legs. common side effects include skin redness or irritation where applied, increased red blood cell count, headache, diarrhea, vomiting, and increase in psa. see your doctor, and for a 30-day free trial, go to axiron.com. >> shepard: the white house warning iran it better be ready for serious talks about its nuclear program. even though iran's leaders call the negotiations worthless. i'm sure they are. the white house is reporting it
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hopes one-on-one talks about the country's disputed nuclear program but warps the window for negotiations will not stay open forever. just this weekend iran's supreme leader, ayatollah khomeini, discussed the idea of negotiations. still, u.s. officials iran could face more economic punishment if it will not come to the table. >> we continue to believe that with seriousness, there is a diplomatic solution to be had here. the question is whether the iran yandle gage will come, ready to roll up their sleeves and help the international community be reassured with regard to their number kerr program. >> shepard: yesterday it was reported iran has installed nearly 200 of its advanced centrifuge machines that can triple the speed -- [sneezing] -- excuse me -- at which iran can grow its nuclear stockpile. everybody sneezes, just not always on television.
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>> chris: have you done that before on television? >> shepard: i don't think i was on camera at the time but i might have been. if i was, it's a mess, and i apologize. >> chris: did you wipe your nose? >> shepard: on the script, i was about to throw at you. >> god bless you. >> shepard: thank you so much. it's my understanding iran and the united states can work everything out and they're going to cancel this stupid tax thing and everything is going to be great. >> you obviously don't just have a cold, you have a fief ever. no. it's a mess, and the big thing that you pointed out there is that while iran continues to delay -- and they haven't had talks since june -- they have greatly increased their capacity for enriching our rainian, about -- uranium, and remember when benjamin netanyahu had the cartoon bomb and he drew the line across it and said, this is the red line? well, we're getting closer and closer to that point.
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the red line. so, it's a growing concern. at what point will they reach a point where the iranians could break out and develop a nuclear weapon very quickly and either the u.s. and/or israel will decide they have to take that capability out. >> shepard: are there assurances, chris, for people who heard about yellow cake and nuclear bombs going off and heard all that hype and all that rhetoric, that turned out none of wait was true, not a word. i'm not saying they're lying but we didn't get the right information. do we know? >> the answer is, you don't know. it's an art, not a science. we could be overstating what their capability is or be grass clickly understating their capability, and that's the concern. they could be much closer and suddenly announce, guess what, we have a nuclear bomb and they have -- we won't think that has happened yet but, again,
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netanyahu was talking in terms of this summer. late spring, early summer. hear in- -- march 1st is next week. so this is getting serious. and one would think with the more than six-month delay in talks since the last time, this is a pretty important set of talks they're having now in kazakhstan on tuesday. >> shepard: a couple months ago when we were speaking about this in the context of israel, israel was working towards election. the elections are passed. they formed this government. what effect does that have, the forming the new government and how the leadership might act or react. >> that's an interesting question. they have not formed a government. netanyahu is trying to cobble together -- they have had the election but he has not been able to cobble together a majority at the kaneset, and he could put together right wing parties which would be more aggressive. so that's another variable we
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don't know. it's a dangerous situation, and again, the bottom line is they have tripled their cat to enrich uranium and that's got to give everybody a lot of concern. >> shepard: who are you talking to this weekend? >> we'll talk about the big sequester, the $85 billion in spending cuts that were never going to happy. as of sunday witness will be t-minus five days and counting. then the governors are in town. i know you're excited about that. we'll be talking to scott walker and jack markell or delware and have to ask marcel about joe biden's suggestion that joe biden should get a shat shot gun and start blasting aim from the balcony. turns out it's against the law. >> shepard: it is. i was reading on the blog you were dancing around the idea of mitt romney becoming a contributor here. >> i wasn't, that wag somebody adding up two and two and coming
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to seven. he is not going to work at fox news. >> shepard: just cure you get all internal information from the blog so i figured i'd ask you. chris, have a great weekend. >> thank you. >> shepard: an up and coming rapper was among the victims of the shooting and car cabrera crash in the heart of the vegas strip in front of the bellagio. we have cell phone video that shows the fiery aftermath. the police say the man was driving the maserati when somebody pulled up in a range rover, just opened fire. the sports car slammed into a taxi, which exploded in flames. the cab driver and a passenger also died. the rapper went by the name of kenny clutch. his father says, learning your son has died, is like taking a baseball bat and hitting you in the back of the head. >> when you hear it, the way it
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touches home, i don't want nobody to feel like i feel. nobody. not a person to feel like this. i just have to deal with it. have to mourn my son's death. >> shepard: six other people suffered injuries and this morning colleagues held a vigil for the taxi driver near the scene of the crash. police are still looking for the range rover with custom rims and tinted windows. it's been more than 15 years sin ben affleck won an oscar for writing good will hunting. but he could make a huge oscar comeback this weekend for are go. what's your oscar pick? we get to the emergency room... and then...and then they just wheeled him away. i had to come to that realization that "wow, i am having a heart attack." i can't punch this away. i'm on a bayer aspirin regimen. [ male announcer ] aspirin is not appropriate for everyone. so be sure to talk to you doctor
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>> shepard: this weekend's academy awards. the experts say ben affleck directed "argo" is the best chance for the prize. entertainment journalist is with us to break them down. "argo," loved it. >> fantastic. the biggest surprise of all is even the it will definitely win bess picture, in my opinion, but ben affleck is not even a contender. not even nominated for best director. that's the biggest snub everybody has been talking about. he swept the entire awards season, won everything he could win except he won't win this. >> shepard: how can you explain that, he wasn't even nominated? >> you can't. at it one of those jaw-dropping snubs where people say, how did it happen? i don't know. nobody knows. they say it's one of the biggest snubs of all-time. >> shepard: a big name under best directors there. >> steven spielberg for lincoln.
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>> shepard: tide you love it? >> i thought it was fantastic. and daniel day-lewis is fantastic, also sweep egg all of the awards this season, and definitely going to take it for best actor. >> shepard: nominated for costume and makeup? >> that's a good question. i don't know. it's spectacular. i'm sure it is. and sally fields, nominated for support actress, but probably not going to get it. >> shepard: best actor. >> best actor, daniel day lewis, absolutely sure, no. do you it would be a complete upset if anybody got it. bradley cooper would be the only other person who might sneak in there. >> shepard: no walking phoenix at -- joaquin phoenix. >> no. >> shepard: best actress or actor female. >> best act foree mail. i like that. jennifer lawrence. this is one of the seasons where you kind of wonder, who is it going to be? jennifer lawrence, just like daniel day-lewis, has swept all of the awards this season.
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jessica -- when hey have the been against each other in the other awards shows they have always gone number one and number two jennifer lawrence taking the trophy. >> shepard: for the grandmotheries, cbs knocked down the scantily clad -- the oscars is having none of that. >> i don't think people have to worry about it too much at the oscar, unless you have ang lieb na jolie's legs poking out. >> shepard: one big surprise? >> if there's one big surprise, i think it would be "argo" not winning best picture, and "zero dark thirty" getting it. these are people who are hollywood insiders and just based on how the directors awards have gone and the sags have gone, it's clear that "argo" is going to take this.
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>> shepard: all right. on to the ballot where adolph hitler is on the list, so is billy the kirk among other people with up usual legal names. tell you where that is happening next.
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>> frankenstein is running for office, but get something competition from adolph hitler. real people up for election in a state in northeast india. also on the ballot. candidates named process, highlander predecessor, and fairly burt. the history professor in the area says people started naming their children after random english words and names and the trend stuck. sometimes the locals don't understand the connection between the name and the thing over here, not like adolph hitler. photos have churchill, roosevelt, and

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